CAD Designs for Bioprinting: Lattices

Creating 3D designs for bioprinting requires certain considerations to ensure an optimal tool path that will work with complex materials and cell types. Lattices are a common design in bioprinting for testing new materials and parameters in bioprinting, creating a simple 3D porous structure that provides for nutrient transport and waste export. Watch this video Read More

Custom G-code Tutorial: Dots, Lines, Lattices and Thin Films

Overview While most prints can and should be easily prepared without developing custom gcode through the use of Slic3r, manually editing print files allows users the versatility to adjust and create unique print processes. Slic3r is suggested to prepare print files before attempting custom g-code. Custom g-code is designed for specific use-case scenarios when slic3r is Read More

Creating 3D Controls: Bioprint Study

New to the world of 3D biology, or testing out a new matrix material with your BioBot? This protocol is part of a series to help you learn how to design experiments and easily build with life! Before you begin bioprinting, you need to make sure you have proper controls. Typical 2D culture controls are Read More

Soft Tissue Kit Protocol

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in bioprinted Gelatin/Fibrin Processed Gelatin/Fibrin Soft Tissue Kit contains all the materials needed to print with this gelatin-based hydrogel, which solidifies through enzymatic crosslinking with a thrombin, calcium chloride, and transglutaminase solution. The recommended preparation provided in the user instruction below yields a streamlined matrix bioink that Read More

Collagen and FRESH printing

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in LifeInk200 (collagen) after 1 day of culture. LifeInk200 is a high concentration collagen bioink that can be thermally crosslinked at temperatures above 10ºC. Due to its concentration, it has impressive shape fidelity during bioprinting. However, since LifeInk200 cannot support itself before crosslinking, we Read More

Printing with GelMA: Troubleshooting

Below are some common issues users have when printing with GelMA and potential troubleshooting steps. For more details on this material, check out some background information, our protocol or our bioreport. Issue 1: My GelMA solution seems to have a low viscosity, or quickly dispenses out of my syringe. Troubleshooting tip 1: Try placing your syringe on ice Read More

Cell Culture Tracker

Many primary and stem cell cultures have unpredictable proliferation rates, making it difficult to plan studies. While there will always be a degree of unpredictability, tracking and analyzing experimental data over time can help predict general trends.  Use this program to track the progress of your cell culture growth to better estimate proliferation rates of different Read More

Creating 3D Controls: Encapsulation Study

New to the world of 3D biology, or testing out a new matrix material with your BioBot? This protocol is the first of a series to help you learn how to design experiments and easily build with life! Before you begin bioprinting, you need to make sure you have proper controls. Typical 2D culture controls Read More

PEGDA

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in bioprinted PEGDA Poly(ethyelene glycol) diacryate is a PEG-based hydrogel that reacts and crosslinks in the presence of lithium phenyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphosphinate (LAP) and BioBots blue light technology(1,2). The recommended preparation provided in the user instruction below yields a streamlined matrix bioink that supports 3D printed cell-laden constructs. However, Read More

PLGA Printing

Figure 1: PLGA lattice (left), cylinder (middle) and line (right) structures printed with the BioBot 1. Overview Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), or PLGA, is a common thermoplastic used in hard tissue engineering[1,2]. Storage and Handling PLGA should be stored at – 20ºC in an airtight container. You Will Need PLGA Needles For traditional printing methods, we suggest these 25 Read More