Soft Tissue Kit Protocol

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in bioprinted Gelatin/Fibrin Processed Gelatin/Fibrin Soft Tissue Kit contains all the materials needed to print with this gelatin-based hydrogel, which solidifies through enzymatic crosslinking with a thrombin, calcium chloride, and transglutaminase solution. The recommended preparation provided in the user instruction below yields a streamlined matrix bioink that Read More

Processed Gelatin/Fibrin Bioprinted Viability

Introduction Matrix bioinks, or cell-encapsulating bioinks, are arguably the most important reagents used in the bioprinting processes. These materials must shield cells from shear stresses during the printing process, closely mimic the extracellular matrix and offer quick, nontoxic gelation for optimal print resolution. Types of matrix bioinks range from simple cell slurries suspended in media Read More

Collagen and FRESH printing

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in LifeInk200 (collagen) after 1 day of culture. LifeInk200 is a high concentration collagen bioink that can be thermally crosslinked at temperatures above 10ºC. Due to its concentration, it has impressive shape fidelity during bioprinting. However, since LifeInk200 cannot support itself before crosslinking, we Read More

Modeling Thrombosis with Sacrificial Bioprinting

Thrombosis constitutes a major reason for morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular diseases and its complications. An in vitro thrombosis model has been recently built by taking advantage of an optimized sacrificial bioprinting strategy [1]. Using a bioprinter (BioBot Beta), i, ii) a template and a wall is printed with 40% Pluronic F127 aqueous solution, followed Read More

BioBots Reagent Guide

Want some guidance on what BioBots reagents to use with your BioBot 1 bioprinter? Check out the information below to learn more about available reagents to purchase for use with your BioBot 1. Each of these reagents has a bioreport (our testing results) and protocol for suggested use with the BioBot 1 bioprinter. Many in Read More

Stanford Researchers Develop Novel Bioink

Figure (adapted):  A) Schematic depicting the drawbacks of commonly used bioinks for each stage of the printing process. These drawbacks can be overcome by new biomaterials development. B) Schematic of the two material components of MITCH-Alginate and its dual-stage crosslinking. In the first stage, noncovalent binding between two complementary peptides forms a weak gel upon mixing Read More

Percoll Improves Bioprinted Cell Distribution

Percoll is a well-referenced media for density gradient centrifugation of cells, viruses and subcellular particles(1). Percoll is composed of colloidal silica coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Percoll has also been previously used to improve cell distribution when bioprinting with low viscosity matrix bioinks(2). Below, Percoll is tested with two BioBots reagents, PEGDA and fibrinogen. Results PEGDA Read More

PEGDA

Overview Figure 1:  Live/dead image of human neonatal dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in bioprinted PEGDA Poly(ethyelene glycol) diacryate is a PEG-based hydrogel that reacts and crosslinks in the presence of lithium phenyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphosphinate (LAP) and BioBots blue light technology(1,2). The recommended preparation provided in the user instruction below yields a streamlined matrix bioink that supports 3D printed cell-laden constructs. However, Read More

Bioprinted PEGDA Viability

Introduction Poly(ethyelene glycol) diacryate is one of the most common synthetic hydrogels used for cell encapsulation. Advantages of this biomaterial include biocompatibility, hydrophilicity and the ability to chemically tailor the material (1-3). This study tests the viability of bioprinted PEGDA (MW 3400), Percoll and lithium phenyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphosphinate (LAP) with a BioBots printer. Results Crosslinking Viability  First, a variety Read More

Gelatin Methacrylate Review

Gelatin methacrylate, commonly referred to as gelMA, is a photocrosslinkable natural bioink derived from a hydrolytic degradation of collagen (1). GelMA is commonly used in drug delivery systems and wound dressing applications (1). With its cell encapsulation properties and thixotropic nature, gelMA is also a common reagent used for bioprinting (8). It has been used Read More